Ban UK Ivory Sales

On 20 December 2018, the UK Ivory Bill completed its passage through Parliament and became the Ivory Act 2018. The Act is expected to come into force later in 2019 and will implement one of the strongest ivory trade bans in the world.

Please go to 'What the Ban Means' for a summary of the Act.

Elephants need OUR help.

About Us

Image credit: Africa Tanzania Tarangire National Park by Environmental Investigation Agency

About Us

Some 20,000 elephants are slaughtered each year for their ivory and only bold action can save this iconic creature from being poached to extinction. We are a group of organisations committed to working together with the goal of harnessing widespread public support to save elephant populations.

Why action is needed

African elephants are being devastated by poaching to meet consumer demand for ivory. The UK has one of the world’s largest domestic ivory markets, particularly from colonial times when the ivory of more than one million elephants was imported for everything from ornaments to piano keys. Much of it is still traded, both here and in Asian markets, to which the UK is the world’s largest exporter. To end poaching, we must end all demand.

Why action is needed

Image credit: Elephant mourning at scene of poached carcass, Kenya by Environmental Investigation Agency

What the ban means

Image credit: Elephant in Chobe National Park, Botswana by Environmental Investigation Agency

What the ban means

On 23 May 2018, the Government published their draft Ivory Bill. The Bill passed swiftly through Parliament with cross-party support and became the Ivory Act 2018 on 20 December 2018. We have put together a summary of the main elements of the Act.

Facts and fallacies

The antiques lobby claims sales of antique ivory have no link to elephants being killed today, that a ban would drive dealers out of business, family heirlooms would have to be destroyed or forfeited and museums would have to start emptying their exhibit cases. Understand the scaremongering and read for yourself the full facts of the impact of a UK ivory trade ban.

Facts and fallacies

Image credit: Two Elephants in Addo Elephant National Park by Brian Snelson

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